Cornelia 50
circa 88 BC. Roman Republic silver. Mint - Rome.



On the front of this coin is the bust of Mars in Corinthian helmet, facing right, as seen from behind. Holding a spear and a parazonium, or dagger; the strap of which is visible over the right shoulder. Border of dots.









On the reverse side of this coin is the Goddess Victory riding in biga, which is a Latin word for a chariot drawn by two horses. She holds a wreath in her right hand, the reigns in the left. The entire image is facing right. In the exergue, which is a small space on the reverse side of a coin found below the principle image, is the name CN LENTVL.



Coin Ref: Cornelia 50, Crawford 345/1; Sydenham 702; Sear 254
CNAEUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS
Cornelia 51
circa 88 BC. Roman Republic silver Quinarius or 'half denarii'
Mint - Rome.



The image on the front of this coin is that of a laureate head of the Roman God Jupiter facing right. Border of dots.




Coin Ref: Crawford 345/2, Sydenham 703; Sear 255; Cornelia 51






The Goddess Victory is standing, and crowning a trophy with a wreath. In the exergue, which is a small space on the reverse side of a coin  found below the principle image, is the name CN LENT. The letters NT in monogram. Border of dots.
Roman Silver Coins Volume 1 - Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby
London: B.A.Seaby Ltd 1952, p. 2.
~ NOTES ~

CN = Cnaeus
LENTVL = Lentulus

The moneyer for Cornelia No.’s 50-53 is probably Cnaeus Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus who was appointed consul in 72 BC, the year after the slave revolt of Spartacus.  Lentulus was defeated by Spartacus on more than one occasion before Crassus saved the day.  Lentulus went on to become Pompey’s legate against the pirates. The name Clodianus is his family name. His middle name implies that his family is part of the Cornelii clan known as Lentulus.

In Sydenham, on pg. 109, he attributes this coin to: CN. [CORNELIUS]  LENTULUS [MARCELLINUS]

For Further Reading on the Cornelia 50:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. I, pg. 2440
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 32
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 109, 241
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg.120
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 356

For Further Reading on the Cornelia 51:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. I, pg. 2443
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 32
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 109, 241
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg.120
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 356


NOTES on 51:

“This piece probably commemorates the victories of M. Claudius M. f. M.n. Marcellus over Hannibal in the second Punic War which culminated in the capture of Syracuse in B.C. 212.”
Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 32

51a similar but instead of CN LENT with NT in monogram, this coin has NT as individual letters.
For Further Reading:      Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 32

Although both Sydenham and Sear mention the differences they do not classify the coin as 51 & 51a. They simply mention the Cornelia 51 and state - “NT is sometimes in monogram.”




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A few examples of the Cornelia 50