CORNELIA 66 - 68
Cornelia 66 - LUCIUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS CRUS. Circa 49-48 BC. Roman republic silver denarius. Mint - Apollonia (then Asia) The front of this coin depicts the head of an older bare headed and bearded Jupiter. On the reverse side is an altar statue of the Goddess Diana, Artemis of Ephesus and she is holding filet. On the right side of the coin are the letters MAR and COS. MAR in monogram. On the left side are the letters L LENTVLVS.  Cornelia 66; Crawford 445/3; Sydenham 1031; Sear 416.

Note: Lucius Cornelius Lentulus Crus was a pro Consul of Pompey.
Roman Silver Coins, Volume 1 - Republic to Augustus
by H.A.Seaby, London 1952, p.35
For Further Reading on Cornelia 66:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pg. 467, 23
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 34
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 172, 242
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 152
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 462


Cornelia 67 - Similar to Cornelia No.66 but it has C MAR COS instead of just MAR COS. Cornelia 67; Crawford 445/3b; Sydenham 1031b; Sear 416.

For Further Reading on Cornelia 67:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pg. 466n
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pg. 34
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 172, 242
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 152
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 462




Cornelia 68 - CN NERIA. Circa 49 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius. Mint – Apollonia (then Asia) On the front is the bearded head of Saturn facing right, a harpa or sickle over the shoulder. In front of the head are the letters NERI Q VRB [NE & VR in monogram]. On the reverse side is the legionary eagle between two standards inscribed with the letters H and P, which stands for Hastati and Princeps. On the left side of the coin are the letters L Lent, the NT in monogram. On the right side are the letters C Marc, the MA in monogram. Below are the letters COS. Cornelia 68; Crawford 441/1; Sydenham 937; Sear 411. This currency is also, or often, catalogued as a Neria No.1 and Claudia No.7.
Roman Silver Coins, Volume 1 - Republic to Augustusby H.A.Seaby, London 1952, p.58
For Further Reading on Cornelia 68:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. I, pg. 3950
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 26, 34 & 58
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 157, 242
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 151
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 460

Cornelia 68a which is also classified as a Claudia 8
Similar but VRB is omitted on the obverse, or front. It has only NERI Q.

For Further Reading on Cornelia 68a
a. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 26 & 58
b. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pg. 157

~ NOTES ~

Consuls: Cn. Nerius Cornelius Lentulus and C. Claudius Marcellus.

“The head of Saturn alludes to the fact that Nerius was Quarstor Urbanus, the eagle and standards to the fact that this issue was occasioned by military needs; the consular dating of the issue is unusual.”
Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 461

"Nerius was appointed quaestor urbanus by the Pompeian party in B.C. 49 and in virtue of his office struck these coins. On the approach of Julius Caesar to the capitol he fled with the consuls to Sicily. The head of Saturn refers to the temple of that divinity at Rome, which was under the special charge of the quaestores urbani, as it contained the public treasury. The standards refer to the Roman army, its legions and the companies of the Hastati and the Principles, to which the Pompeian party looked especially for support. This issue no doubt was intended for military purposes."
Roman Silver Coins, Volume 1 - Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby, London 1952, p.58.)

“Nerius strikes as quaestor urbanus and names the two consuls for 49 BC on rev."
Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 151

“Nos. 64 – 68 were struck for the two consuls of B.C. 49, both of whom supported the part of Pompey and were violently opposed to Caesar, on whose approach to Rome they fled to Sicily, where No.64 was struck. They then went, via Greece, to Asia Minor where Nos. 65-67a were struck. The triskelis is taken from the early coins of Syracuse and the reverse of both coins is claimed to be a copy of the famous statue of Zeus Eleutherios, by Myron, which was set up by the Syracusans as a memorial to their freedom in B.C. 460.”
Roman Silver Coins, Volume 1 - Republic to Augustus
by H.A.Seaby, London 1952, pg. 34

After Caesar had taken control of Rome he hunted Pompey's armies and his supporters from southern Italy to Greece. Battle after battle, Caesar was victorious. Sadly, with his armies defeated, Pompey met his wife Cornelia and their son Sextus Pompeius on the island of Mytilene to debated where to go next. They decided upon Egypt. On September 29 47BC, Pompey's 58th birthday, King Ptolemy invited Pompey ashore to discuss asylum. What Pompey did not know was that it was trap. While he sat in the boat, studying the speech that he had prepared for the boy king, two men stabbed him in the back and then cut off his head. When Caesar arrived he was offered the head as a trophy but according to Plutarch he turned away from it; "and when he received Pompey's signet ring on which was engraved a lion holding a sword in his paws, he burst into tears." This was not how he wanted Pompey to died and so enraged was Caesar that he deposed Ptolemy and put Cleopatra on the throne of Egypt. Caesar then gave Pompey's ashes and ring to Cornelia, who took them back to his estates in Italy.

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