P CORNELIUS
LENTULUS MARCELLINUS
Cornelia 69/Claudia 11
Circa 50 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius.  Mint - Rome.


On the front of this coin is the bare head of the consul M Claudius Marcellus facing right. He was Consul in 222BC) Behind his head is a triskeles, or symbolic figure consisting of three legs radiating  from a common center. In fron are the letters MARCELLINVS. Border of dots.







On the reverse side is M. Claudius Marcellus is seen walking, facing right and carrying a trophy (spolia opina) within tetrastyle temple of Jupiter Feretrius.  On the left side are the letters COS Q VIN Q and on the right MARCELLVS. Border of dots.




Coin Ref:  Cornelia 69; Crawford 439/1; Sydenham 1147; Sear 409.  This currency is also catalogued as a Claudia 11.
~ NOTES ~

For Further Reading:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. I, pg. 4206
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 26 & 34
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 187, 242
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 151
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 460

“This type relates to two great events in the history of the moneyer’s family, both connected with the career of M. Claudius Marcellus, the most illustrious of all who bore that name, and who was consul five times. He captured Syracuse in B.C. 212 and in B.C. 222 he had dedicated, in the Temple of Jupiter Feretrius, the spoils he had taken from the Gaulish chief Britomartus, whom he slew with his own hand. An ancestor of the moneyer with the name Claudius was adopted by the Cornelia gens.”
Roman Silver Coins, Volume 1 - Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby, London 1952, p.26.

“Harlan prefers to date this issue to the following year, after the outbreak of the civil war between Caesar and Pompey.”
Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 151

Harlan refers to Michael Harlan the author of Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins 63-49 BC (1995).

H. A. Seaby and Edward A. Sydenham both place the date of this coin at 38 BC. David R. Sear and Crawford have 50 BC & Harlan, 51 BC. Harlan refers to Michael Harlan the author of Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins 63-49 BC (1995).

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