P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, C. CASSIUS LONGINUS
& MARCUS JUNIUS BRUTUS
Cornelia 73/Cassius No.6
Circa 42 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius.
Mint – moving with Brutus and Cassius

On the obverse or front is a diademed, or crowned bust of Libertas [Liberty] facing right, veiled, wearing ‘double’ ear-rings and a necklace of dendants. Behind her head are the letters C CASSI IMP. In front are the letters LEIBERTAS.



Coin Ref: Cornelia 73; Crawford 500/5; Sydenham 1305. This currency is also, or often, catalogued as a Cassius No.6 and, or as a Cassia 18




On the reverse side of this coin is a jug on the right and a litus on the left. The litus a short curving or crooked staff borne by an augur used in religious ceremonies of divination to mark out an area for the observation of birds. It appears on the coinage as a symbol of the Roman priesthood of the Augures. Underneath are the letters LENTVLVS SPINT.
Note: Both sides of this coin refer to the appointment of P Cornelius Lentulus to the college of Augurs.  Military mint in Smyrna.

see also CORNELIA 71
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93
Coin Ref: Cornelia 76; Crawford 500/1; Sydenham 1308.  This currency is also, or often, catalogued as a Cassia 14 & Cassius No.7.
This drawing is from H. A. Seaby's  Roman Silver Coins, Vol.I Republic to Augustus (1952) pg.104. It clearly shows the letters C CASSI IMP on the front of the coin behind the head which the above examples lack.
Cornelia 76/Cassius No.7
Circa 42 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius.
Mint – moving with Brutus and Cassius

On the front is a tripod surmounted by a cauldron with a cortina, or partial veil consisting of silky fibrils, or strands. On either side depends, or hangs a fillet, which are fasteners consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members. The reverse is identical to the Cornelia 73 and 75.

NOTE:  In regards to the Cornelia 76, H. A. Seaby notes - "This may refer to the sacrifice offered to Apollo for his recent victories." - Roman Silver Coins, Vol.I Republic to Augustus (1952) pg.104.

Here is a 'Greek' coin of P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinter but it is not an official numbered coin of the Cornelia.
P. CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER
GREEK: Phrygia, Apameia. Circa 56-54 BC. AR
Cistophoric Tetradrachm (10.21 gm).

Front: Cista mystica with serpent; all within ivy. Reverse: wreath / [P]-LENTVLVS-P[F] / IMPERATOR in two lines above bow-case with serpents; monogram to left, Capricorn to right, MUISKOU below.

Note: The legate P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, a former Pompeian and now one of Cassius' imperators; the Latin word imperator was the title of every Roman general.
For Further Reading on Cornelia 73
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pgs. 482, 74
b. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 204, 242
c. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 514



Cornelia 72 - Identical to Cornelia 73 but struck in gold.
Babelon 72, Crawford 500/4, Sydenham 1304. This coin is also catalogued as a Cassia 17

For Further Reading on Cornelia 72:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pg. 483, 73
b. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 204, 242
c. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 514.
Cornelia 75/Cassius No.4
Circa 42 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius.
Mint – moving with Brutus and Cassius

On the obverse or front is a diademed, or crowned head of Libertas [Liberty] facing right, wearing ear-ring and necklace; hair in knot and falling down neck. Behind her head are the letters C CASSI IMP. In front are the letters LEIBERTAS.



Coin Ref: Cornelia 75; Crawford 500/3; Sydenham 1307. This currency is also, or often, catalogued as a Cassius No.4 and, or as a Cassia 16




On the reverse side of this coin is a jug on the right and a litus on the left. The litus a short curving or crooked staff borne by an augur used in religious ceremonies of divination to mark out an area for the observation of birds. It appears on the coinage as a symbol of the Roman priesthood of the Augures. Underneath are the letters LENTVLVS SPINT.
Cornelia 74 - Identical to Cornelia 75 but struck in gold.
Babelon 72, Crawford 50/4, Sydenham 1304. This coin is also catalogued as a Cassia 17

For Further Reading on Cornelia 74:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pg. 482, 76
b. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 204, 242
c. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 514.
For Further Reading:
a. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber
London, 1910, Vol. II, pgs. 482, 77
b. Roman Silver Coins Vol.I Republic to Augustus by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 34, 25 & 104
c. The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 204, 242
d. Roman Coins and Their Values by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 277
e. Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 514