Cornelia 1 - PUB CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 151 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of Roma facing right, X behind. On the reverse side of this coin is Victory in biga right.

Asses, Triens, Quadrans, Sextans and Semis.

Cornelia 15 - This coin is only found in Babelon & Grueber, not in any other source.

Cornelia 17 - CN CORNELIUS SISENA, circa 103-100 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted head of Roma, facing right. Behind head are the letters SISENA, front are the letters ROMA. There is an X below chin. Reverse side depicts Jupiter in quadriga, facing right and hurling a thunderbolt. Below horses is the defeated Anguipede. There is a thunderbolt to his right. In the exergue are the letters CN CORNEL L F.

Cornelia 18 - PUBLIUS CORNELIUS CETHEGUS, circa 114-114 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of Roma wearing a Phrygian helmet, facing right. The letters EX S C are behind his head. Below his chin is a XVI monogram.  The reverse side shows the helmeted shepherd Atys riding a goat, facing right but some have speculated that the figure might be that of Dionysus. Directly below the goat is the name CETEGVS. In the exergue is the name ROMA.  

Cornelia 19 - CN CORNELIUS BLASIO, circa 112-111 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted head facing right, XVI monogram above, CN BLASIO CN F along right side. On the reverse side is Jupiter standing being crowned between Juno and Minerva. Between Jupiter and Minerva is a control mark. In the exergue is the name ROMA.  

Cornelia 19a - CN CORNELIUS BLASIO, circa 112-111 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted head facing right, XVI monogram above, CN BLASIO CN F along right side. On the reverse side is Jupiter standing being crowned between Juno and Minerva. Between Jupiter and Minerva is a control mark; a BLA [Blasio] monogram. In the exergue is the name ROMA.       

Cornelia 20 - CN CORNELIUS BLASIO, circa 112/111 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted head  facing right; grain ear behind head, XVI monogram above. CN BLASIO CN F on right side. On the reverse side of this coin is Jupiter standing between Juno and Minerva; palm between Jupiter and Minerva. In the exergue is an eagle between
RO - MA.    

Cornelia 21, 22, 23 - These three are an As, Semis and Quadran of CN CORNELIUS BLASIO.

Cornelia 24 - L CORNELIUS SCIPIO ASIAGENUS, circa 106 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Laureate head of Jupiter facing left. On the reverse side of this coin is Jupiter holding sceptre and thunderbolt in quadriga, facing right. There is a control letter above. In the exergue is the name L SCIP ASIAG.  The sides of the coin are serrated or notched. 

Cornelia 25 - PUB CORNELIUS LENTULUS MARCELI, circa 100 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Bust of young Hercules facing right, shoulders clad in lion's skin, club over shoulder, shield behind, control letter behind head, ROMA below. Reverse side is helmeted Roma standing facing, holding spear, crowned by Genius of the Roman people, standing facing on right, holding cornucopiae, the letter between figures, in the exergue is the name LENT MAR F; all within laurel-wreath  

Cornelia 26 - PUB CORNELIUS LENTULUS MARCELI, circa 100 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. This coin is almost identical to a Cornelia No.25 but instead of the letters ROMA there are the letters PESC below the head of Hercules.     

Cornelia 27 - This is an As of PUBLIUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS MARCELLINUS

Cornelia 28 - Gold coin of L. CORNELIUS SULLA

Cornelia 29 - L CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 84-83 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Diademed or Crowned head of the Goddess Venus facing right. Cupid is standing to the right holding long palm. The letters L SVLLA beneath. On the reverse is a capis & lituus between two trophies. The letters ITERVM are at the bottom. 

Cornelia 30 - L CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 84-83 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. This coin is almost identical to a Cornelia No.29 except on the reverse side where the 29 has the letters ITERVM, the 30 has just INTERV.  

Cornelia 31 - This coin is only found in Babelon & Grueber, not in any other source.

Cornelia 32 - ANONYMOUS, circa 81 BC, Roman Republic Gold. On the front of this coin is the diademed or crowned head of the Goddess Venus facing right. On the reverse side is a double cornucopia, or Horn of Plenty. The letter Q is seen below. This coin is identical to a Cornelia 33.

Cornelia 33 - ANONYMOUS, circa 81 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Diademed or crowned head of Venus facing right. On the reverse side is a double cornucopiae; the letter Q is below.

Cornelia 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - As, Quadran, Sextan and Unicae

Cornelia 38 - L. CORNELIUS SULLA & L. MANILIUS PRO Q, circa 82 BC. Roman Republic Gold. Identical to the Cornelia 39. On the front of there is a helmeted head of Roma facing right. On the reverse side is Sulla in triumphal quadriga, facing right and being crowned by Victory. In the exergue are the letters L SVLLA IM.

Cornelia 39 - L. CORNELIUS SULLA & L. MANLIUS TORQUATUS, circa 82 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted Head of 'Roma' facing right; the words PROQ on left and L MANLI on the right. On the reverse side is Triumphator in quadriga, crowned by Victory who flies above. Underneath the chariot in the exergue is the name - L SVLLA IM.   This coin is also catalogued as a Manlia 4.

Cornelia 40 - L. CORNELIUS SULLA & MANLIUS TORQUATUS, circa 82 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius. This coin is almost identical to the Cornelia No.39 except on the reverse side of the 39 which has L SVLLA IM, the 40 has L SVLLA IMP, or an added P. Catalogued also as a Manlia 5.

Cornelia 41 - L MANLIUS TORQUATUS, circa 82 BC. Roman Republic Aureus (gold)

Cornelia 42 - L. CORNELIUS SULLA & L. MANLIUS TORQUATUS, circa 82 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted Head of 'Roma' facing right; the words PROQ on left and L MANLI on the right. On the reverse side is Triumphator in quadriga, crowned by Victory who flies above. Underneath the chariot in the exergue is the name - L SVLLA IMP. This coin is also catalogued as a Manlia 7.

Cornelia 43 - L. CORNELIUS SULLA & L. MANLIUS TORQUATUS, circa 82 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius. This coin is almost identical to the Cornelia No.42 except on the reverse side of the 42 which has L SVLLA IM, this coin has L SVLLA IMP, or an added P [some coins even have IMPE]. The four horses are also in a perfect row leaning backward. Catalogued also as a Manlia 8.

Cornelia 44 - L CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 81 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. The head of the Goddess Venus, control letter behind head. On the reverse side there is a single cornucopia in the center. To the left are the letters SC and on the right side are the letters EX. This refers to the Latin phrase Ex Senatus Consulto. There is a wreath around the image.

Cornelia 45 - L LICINIVS L. F. MACER, circa 84 BC. Romam Æ As. The laureate head of Janus, on left are the letters C. LICINI. L. F.; on the reverse is a prow on which stands a male figure lholding a staff; above are the letters EX S.C. and below MACER.

Cornelia 46 - A MANLI A F Q, circa 80 BC. Roman Republic Gold. On the front of this coin is the bust of Roma facing right in plumed helmet. On the reverse is an equestrian statue of Sulla, letters L SVLL FELI DIC.

Cornelia 47 - A MANLI A F Q, circa 80 BC. Roman Republic silver denarius. On the front of this coin is the bust of Roma facing right in plumed helmet. On the reverse is an equestrian statue of Sulla, letters L SVLL FELI DIC.

Cornelia 48 - Q POMPEIUS RUFUS, circa 54 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Bare headed L. Cornelius Sulla, facing right. Letters SVLLA COS. On reverse side is the bare head of Quintus Pompeius Rufus also facing right. Behind his head are the letters RVFVS COS . In front of his head are the letters Q POM RVFI. 

Cornelia 49 - Q POMPEIUS RUFUS, circa 54 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. A curule chair with a litus, or crooked staff to the left, wreath to right. Above the letters SVLLA COS. In the exegrue are the letters Q POMPEI RVF. On reverse is another curule chair, left an arrow and right is laurel branch. Above are the letters Q POMPEI Q F RVFVS. In the exergue are the letters COS. 

Cornelia 50 - CN CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 88 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Helmeted bust of Mars facing right, seen from behind. On the reverse side of this coin is Victory in biga right. In the exergue is the name CN LENTVL.

Cornelia 51 - CN CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 88 BC, Roman Republic silver Quinarius. Laureate head of Jupiter facing right. On the reverse side of this coin is Victory crowning a trophy with a wreath. In the exergue is the name CN LENT. 

Cornelia 52 - CN CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 88 BC. Romam Æ As. On the front of this coin is a laureate head of Janus. On the reverse is a prow facingright, the letters CN LENTV above. Rarely is the NT in monogram, or LENTV or LENT, or LEN. The value mark & the letters ROMA omitted

Cornelia 53 - CN CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 88 BC. Semis (brass). On the front is the head of Saturn. On the reverse is a prow, facing right with the Letters with the letters CN LEN above, sometimes with a trident below. The value mark & the letters ROMA omitted.

Cornelia 54 - CNAEUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 76-75 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. GPR above bearded bust of the Genius of the Roman people facing right. On the reverse side; wreathed behind scepter, terrestrial globe & rudder. E X on left side, S C on right. In the exergue is the name CN LEN Q.  

Cornelia 55 - CNAEUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 76-75 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. There is a large bearded bust of the Genius of the Roman people facing right. On the reverse side of this coin; wreathed & filleted scepter, terrestrial globe & rudder. E X on left side, S C on right. In the exergue is the name LENT CVR X FL.  

Cornelia 56 - BARBARIC IMITATION

Cornelia 57 - Cn. CORNELIUS LENTULUS MARCELLINUS, Roman Republic Gold.

Cornelia 58 - PUB LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 71 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of Hercules, facing right. Behind head are the letters Q SC. Reverse side is the Genius of the Roman People seated facing with cornucopia in right hand & a scepter in the left. Nike is flying above and crowning Genius. The letters P LENT P F are to the left of the image and L N are to the right.  

Cornelia 59 - FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 56 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Diademed & draped bust of Diana right; crescent above, lituus behind & FAVSTVS in front. On the reverse is Sulla seated left; Bocchus, king of Mauretania, kneels before & offers olive branch; Jugurtha, king of Numidia, above on right is FELIX.  

Cornelia 60 - FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 56 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Diademed bust of a beardless Hercules facing right. Behind him are the letters FELIX. On the reverse side of this coin; Diana in biga facing right; holding a lituus, crescent above, three stars in field. Below are the letters FAVSTVS. 

Cornelia 61 - FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 56 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of Hercules facing right in lion skin; SC, along with Faustus' monogram, are behind his head. On the reverse side there is a globe between four wreaths, the lower wreath flanked by an aplustre and grain ear. 

Cornelia 62 - FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 56 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of Hercules facing right in lion skin; SC behind head. On the reverse side is a Globe between jeweled wreath and three triumphal wreaths.    

Cornelius 63 - FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA, circa 56 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Laureate, diadmed and draped bust of Venus facing right, scepter over shoulder, S C behind. On the reverse side of this coin are three military trophies between jug and lituus. In the exergue is the monogram of FAVSTVS.   

Cornelia 64 - L CORNELIUS LENTULUS CRUS & GAIUS CLAUDIUS MARCELLINUS, circa 49 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Facing head of Medusa in center of triskeles, ear of corn between each leg. Reverse has Jupiter standing  with thunderbolt & eagle. The letters LENT, MAR and COS. On the far right side there is a harpa. This coins is also catalogued as a Claudia 9.

Cornelia 65 - LUCIUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS CRUS & C CLAUDIUS MARCELLUS, circa 49 BC, Roman republic silver denarius. The head of the young God Jupiter, facing right. Behind his head are the letters COS. In front, L LENT C MARC. On the reverse side is the God Jupiter facing right and standing before a garlanded altar. There is a thunderbolt in his right hand and an eagle perched on his left. Underneath a star & the letter Q.   Also catalogued as a Claudia 10.

Cornelia 66 - LUCIUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS CRUS, circa 49-48 BC. Roman republic silver denarius. The front of this coin depicts only the head of an older bare headed and bearded Jupiter. On the reverse side is an altar statue of the Goddess Diana, Artemis of Ephesus and she is holding a filet. On the right side of the coin are the letters MAR and COS. MAR in monogram. On the left side are the letters L LENTVLVS.

Cornelia 67 - Similar to Cornelia No.66 but it has C MAR COS instead of just MAR COS.

Cornelia 68 - CN NERIA, circa 49 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. The bearded head of Saturn facing right, a harpa over the shoulder. In front are the letters NERI Q VRB . On the reverse side is the legionary eagle between two standards inscribed with the letters H and P, which stands for Hastati and Princeps. On the left are the letters L Lent, on the right the letters C Marc. Below are the letters COS. This coin is also catalogued as a Neria 1.

Cornelia 69 - P CORNELIUS LENTULUS MARCELLINUS, circa 38 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. Head of M Claudius Marcellus facing right. Behind head is a triskeles. On the reverse is Marcellus walking, facing right and carrying a trophy within tetrastyle temple.  Left side are the letters COS QVINQ, right MARCELLVS. This coin is also catalogued as a Claudia 11.

Cornelia 70 - MARCUS JUNIUS BRUTUS, circa 42 BC. Roman Republic Aureus (gold) Identical to the Cornelia 71.

Cornelia 71 - MARCUS JUNIUS BRUTUS, circa  43/42 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. On the front of this coin is a sacrificial axe, a simpulum or vessel and a knife and beneath these are the letters BRVTVS. On the reverse, a capis, or a Roman one-handled vessel on the left and a litus, which is a crooked staff, on the right. Underneath are the letters LENTVLVS SPINT.  This coin is also catalogued as a Brutus 6.

Cornelia 72 - C CASSIUS LONGINUS & P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 42 BC. Roman Republic Aureus (gold) Identical to the Cornelia 73.

Cornelia 73 - C CASSIUS LONGINUS & P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 42 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. On the front is a diademed, or crowned head of Libertas [Liberty] with a veil facing right. Behind her head are the letters C CASSI IMP. In front are the letters LEIBERTAS. The reverse is identical to the Cornelia 74.  This coin is also catalogued as a Cassius 6.

Cornelia 74 - C CASSIUS LONGINUS & P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 42 BC. Roman Republic Aureus (gold) Identical to the Cornelia 75.

Cornelia 75 - C CASSIUS LONGINUS & P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 42 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. On the front is a diademed, or crowned head of Libertas [Liberty] facing right. Behind her head are the letters C CASSI IMP. In front are the letters LEIBERTAS. On the reverse is a jug to the right and litus on the left. Underneath are the letters LENTVLVS SPINT.  This coin is catalogued both as a Cassia 16 & Cassius 4.

Cornelia 76 - C CASSIUS LONGINUS & P CORNELIUS LENTULUS SPINTHER, circa 42 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. On the front is a tripod surmounted by the cortina, on either side depends a fillet. On the left are the letters C CASSI and on the right IMP.  The reverse is identical to the Cornelia 74. This coin is also catalogued as a Cassius 7.

Cornelia 77 - L. CORNELIUS BALBUS, circa 40 BC. Roman Republic Aureus (gold)

Cornelia 78 - L. CORNELIUS BALBUS. circa 40 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius.This coin is also catalogued as an Augustus 417.

Cornelia 79 - COSSUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS GAETULICUS. This coin is also catalogued as an Augustus 418.

Cornelia 80 - COSSUS CORNELIUS & LENTULUS GAETULICUS, circa ? BC. Roman Republic ‘Augustus’ silver denarius. On the front of this coin is the laureate head facing right, in oak leaves of Augustus. Around his head are the letters CAESAR AVGVSTVS. On the reverse side is head of Agrippa facing right, in combined mural & rostral crown. Around his head are the letters M AGRIPPA COS TER COSSVS LENTVLVS.

Cornelia 81 - LUCIUS CORNELIUS LENTULUS, circa 6 BC, Roman Republic silver denarius. The front depicts the head of Augustus, facing right. The reverse has L. Lentvlvs Flamen Martialis standing, left hand on shield and right placing wreath on a statue of Julius Caesar. This coin is also catalogued as an Augustus 419.

~ CORNELIA ~

This site is a study of the coins generated by one particular Roman family known as the Cornelii, or Cornelius. Their origin is all but lost in history but it is rooted in ancient Rome. We know that men and women born within this family were often given names designated by their gender. Male being referred to as Cornelius, female being Cornelia. I have, however, been unable to discover why the coins of this family are referred to by the female gender of Cornelia. They were produced in Rome’s stringent patriarchal society in which the male was the undisputed head of the family. Anyway, my book should not be seen as a definitive study of the coins of this family as much as the discoveries made by one lowly turtle’s journey over a period of many years. In the beginning I found it often arduous trying to wade through numismatic writings in order to track down the specific coins of this gens or family from ancient Rome. My first dilemma was realizing that four of the sources; Description Historique et Chronologique des monnaies de la Republique Romaine by Ernest Babelon, The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Rev. Edward A. Sydenham, Roman Republican Coinage by Michael Crawford and Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum by H. A. Grueber, all give different numbers to the same coin. Although I make note of the numbers used by all these authorities the primary system of numbering which I decided to base my book upon comes from Ernest Babelon. To me it is the simplest. He basically numbers the coins of the Cornelia family one through eighty-one. On the other hand, although there are only eighty-one specific coins of this family, some have sub-classifications due to slight variances being issued so there are actually far more than just eighty-one.

As far as the name Cornelius; there is every indication that in far ancient times Romans citizens possessed only one name like the most Indo-European people. It was during the Republican period, which began around 510BC with the overthrow of the Etruscan monarchy and lasted roughly until around 44BC when Julius Caesar was appointed as dictator, that a more stable naming system slowing emerged referred to as tria nomina. This is when most Roman Citizen took on three names. The first name was called the Praenomen and it designated the individual, similar to our first name. In ancient times the Romans had less than thirty first names and only about ten of them were common. To make the options even less, most clans favored certain praenomina. The Cornelius favored the first names of Gnaeus, Lucius, Publius, Marcus, Servius and Tiberius while the lesser Scipio clan of the Cornelius often selected simply Gnaeus, Lucius, Publius.

In inscriptions and literature some of the more common first names were normally abbreviated as follows: A.=Aulus, Ap=Appius, C.=Gaius, Cn.=Gnaeus, D.=Decimus,  L.=Lucius or Lentulus, M.=Marcus or Manius, Mam=Mamercus, N=Numerius, P or Pub=Publius, Q.=Quintus, S=Sextus, Ser=Servius, Sp=Spurius, T.=Titus and Ti.=Tiberius.

The second, or middle, name was known as the Nomina and it referred to the nomen, or name, of the tribe. This was an inherited name shared by all the members of the family and even special slaves. Originally there were only three patrician tribes in ancient Rome; the Ramnes, Tities and Luceres. Within each of these tribes there were smaller clans. Later, about thirty or more 'plebeian tribes' were added; amongst these was the Cornelius. Over the years, due to war and other reasons, many clans disappeared. By the Middle Republican period a three-letter abbreviation for the tribe in which the man was enrolled was often used; thus it becomes easy to find 'COR' referring to the Cornelius tribe.

The third name was called the Cognomen, or family name, similar to our last name. It was initially formed as stirps, or stems (Latin: lineages) off a given family to designate a line of descent of common ancestry. In other words; a tree known as Cornelius could have many branches. Although this naming behavior is rooted much earlier in Roman history, it would not begin to appear in public documents as commonplace until the time of Lucius Cornelius Sulla. As an example of what has just been said; Lucius Cornelius Sulla implies that Lucius, born within the gens of the Cornelius family tree, is from the stirps or lesser branch of the family known as Sulla. Another example is Publius Cornelius Scipio. His name means that Publius is of the gens Cornelius and the stirps Scipio. In both cases, being men, they assume the title Cornelius and not Cornelia.

Although there were many others, some of the more notable branches off the Cornelius family tree were the Lentulus, Blasio, Scipiones (Scipio), Dolabellae, Sullae (Sulla) Cinnae (Cinna) and Cossus.

Sometimes a fourth, even fifth, name called a Agnomen was added. In some cases this name was a mark of great honor or a distinction which was carried after an outstanding exploit, such as a particularly successful military campaign. For example; Scipio received the honorary agnomen of 'Africanus' because of his military victories over Hanibal during the Second Punic War. Hence his full name became Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus. However, another common reason for the use of a fourth Agnomen is seen with the name Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was a Roman Consul in 138 BC. His last name simply implies that he was born within the Nasica family which is a branch of the Scipio family within the Cornelius. He also gives us an example of a fifth Agnomen being used because later in life he given a sobriquet or ‘nickname’ of Serapio by a tribune named C. Curiatius because of his likeness to a particular dealer in sacrificial victims by that name. Thus we can find his name mentioned as Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica Serapio.

In the case where a man was adopted into another family, which apparently  happened with some frequency in ancient Rome, the individual would assume the Tria Nomina of his adopted family while adding the nomen of his birth gens at the end. An example of this behavior can be seen with Lucius Æmilius Paulus. He was adopted by Publius Cornelius Scipio and took the name Publius Cornelius Scipio Æmilianus.

In a society as rigidly patriarchal as the Romans, women generally had no personal names and were known only by the feminine form of her tribe as reflected by the Nomina not the Cognomen. Thus the daughter of Publius Cornelius Scipio was simply called Cornelia. In cases where more than one daughter existed in the same immediate family they would all have the same name but became designated by the order of birth. For example, three daughters in one family of the Cornelii would be known as Cornelia, Cornelia Secunda (or Cornelia Minor), and Cornelia Tertia. These names were kept even if they were married into a different clan. It would not be until the Imperial period of Rome when women were seen to commonly follow the Tria Nomina.

Historians can see distinct periods in the development of Roman coins. Most agree that the first coin to appear which would be termed a ‘Cornelia’ was that of Publius Cornelius Sulla who’s silver denarius was produced around 151BC or in the ‘Fourth Period’ of coin minting between 155-120BC. It is known as a Babelon 1, or Cornelia 1. It is, however, not the first coin produced honoring a Cornelius. An earlier example would be a bronze coin classified as a Muller No.4 for P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus circa 209BC. On the front of this coin is a head, facing left, of the Roman General P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus. On the opposite side of the coin is a horse standing, facing right. It is a sysmbol of war. There is a palm tree behind the horse which symbolizes Scipio’s victories. Many coins of Scipio from this period show the horse’s tail as being straight down, the Muller 4 has the tail squiggly.

This coin is believed to have been minted Spain in the city of Cartagonova (New Carthage) after the Romans had captured it from the Carthaginians in 209 BC.  Publius Cornelius Scipio would inevitably engaged Haninibal's brother Hadsrubal in the vicinity of Baecula on the upper Guadalquivir River in southern Spain and defeat him. This lead Scipio to conquer all of Spain. This is what is referred to as the Second Punic War. It was fought between from 218 to 201 BC. Shortly afterwards Scipio went to Africa where he conquered the armies Hannibal himself at the battle of Zama. From that point on he becomes known as Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus. He died in 184BC. His brother, Lucius Cornelius Scipio, who also had been with him in Spain, later commanded the armies against Antiochus III of Syria, a petty tyrant who sought dominion in Asia Minor and who had invaded Greece. He was defeated by the Roman armies lead by Lucius Cornelius Scipio at the Battle of Magnesia. Upon Scipio’s triumphant return to Rome he was given the name Lucius Cornelius Scipio Asiagenes, or the conqueror of Asia. His coins are official numbered a Cornelia No.24.
Jerry Edward Cornelius
April 2006






Contact me at:  Cornelius93@aol.com

Copyright (C)
Cornelius 2004





93


THE 81 ROMAN COINS
OF THE CORNELIA
"This site is a continual work in progress. I shall be updating, adding
new pictures of coins and information from my private collection,
whenever I can find the spare time." - J. Edward Cornelius.


The 81 numbers are taken from Ernest Babelon's monumental work titled
Description historique et chronologique des monnaies de la
Republique Romaine, 2 vols, Paris, 1885 and 1886.
Click on the red numbers for full
page listings and photos of each coin.